Savor Our Dishes

Cold hors-d’ouevre

Ham
Homemade cheese-platter
Octopus salad
Anchovies in olive oil
Fish platter

Hot hors-d’ouevres

Omelette (ham, cheese)
Skradin snacks appetizers (fried pilchard)
Spaghetti (tomato sauce, warty venus, shrimps)

Soups

Fish
Beef
Chicken

Crabs

Glass prawns
Shrimps

Fish

Adriatic squid
Prokljan cuttlefish
Seabass
Gilthead
Grouper
John Dorry
Fish stew
Eel
Other white flesh fish

Scallops

Oysters
Warty venus
St.Jacob’s cap (Pecten Jacobaeus)

Meat

Baking lid (lamb, veal, chicken)
Beefsteak ( tenderloin)
Ramsteak
Lamb chops
Chicken grill
Veal chop

Salad

Seasonal Salad

Desserts(various)

Croatian cuisine

Croatian cuisine is heterogeneous and is known as a cuisine of the regions, since every region of Croatia has its own distinct culinary tradition. Its roots date back to ancient times. The differences in the selection of foodstuffs and forms of cooking are most notable between those in mainland and those in coastal regions. Mainland cuisine is more characterized by the earlier Slavic and the more recent contacts with Hungarian and Turkish cuisine, using lard for cooking, and spices such as black pepper, paprika, and garlic. The coastal region bears the influences of the Greek and Roman cuisine, as well as of the later Mediterranean cuisine, in particular Italian (especially Venetian). Coastal cuisines use olive oil, and herbs and spices such as rosemary, sage, bay leaf, oregano, marjoram, cinnamon, clove, nutmeg, and lemon and orange rind. Peasant cooking traditions are based on imaginative variations of several basic ingredients (cereals, dairy products, meat, fish, vegetables, nuts) and cooking procedures (stewing, grilling, roasting, baking), while bourgeois cuisine involves more complicated procedures and use of selected herbs and spices. Charcuterie is part of the Croatian culinary tradition in all regions. 

Croatian cuisine can be divided into several distinct cuisines (Istria, Dalmatia, Dubrovnik, Lika, Gorski Kotar, Zagorje, Međimurje, Podravina, Slavonija) each of which has specific cooking traditions, characteristic for the area and not necessarily well known in other parts of Croatia. Most dishes, however, can be found all across the country, with local variants.

Croatian wine

Croatian wine (vino, pl. vina) has a history dating back to the Ancient Greek settlers, and their wine production on the southern Dalmatian islands of Vis, Hvar and Korčula some 2,500 years ago.[1] Like other old world wine producers, many traditional grape varieties still survive in Croatia, perfectly suited to their local wine hills. Modern wine-production methods have taken over in the larger wineries, and EU-style wine regulations[2] have been adopted, guaranteeing the quality of the wine.

There are currently over 300 geographically defined wine regions, and a strict classification system to ensure quality and origin. The majority of Croatian wine is white, with most of the remainder being red, and only a small percentage is rosé wines. In 2010, Croatia ranked 30th in wine producing countries with an estimated 50,000 tones.[3]

Wine is a popular drink in Croatia, and locals traditionally like to drink wine with their meals. Quite often, the wine is diluted with either still or sparkling water – producing a drink known as gemišt (a combination of white wine and carbonated water), and bevanda (a combination of red wine and still water).

Enjoy your meal!